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Old 04-05-2016, 05:51 PM   #81
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I'm reminded of one we did in high school where we'd take a big cast iron skillet fry a pound of bacon, add a big can of pork and beans and a can of beer and let it simmer till hot. We called it the 3 B's. Another I did when trying to impress the gals was a foil meal of burger, onions, carrots, and potatoes buried in the coals.

My bud in Port Alice has a Sprink Bok with a 75 horse E treck and you talk about a bumpy ride out to Caine's Island to fish salmon. The ride against the wind is a killer, especially at my age.
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Old 04-05-2016, 06:26 PM   #82
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If that were me and my group of friends back in high school, we would have drank the beer and used water for the liquid in the meal. And probably taken a couple more bottles just in case...
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Old 04-05-2016, 06:49 PM   #83
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Alligator snapping turtle stew with swamp cabbage and cabbage palm hearts.
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Old 04-05-2016, 06:50 PM   #84
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Oh, we had plenty of beer, that was never a problem. In those days Wisconsin was an 18 state and we made regular beer runs - we were charmed as we never got in trouble.
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Old 04-05-2016, 08:52 PM   #85
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I wanna go back in time until I'm 15 years old again, back in 1970, with my freind, or any of you guys or gals, with my stepdad's 14 food SeaKing boat with the 21 horse SeaKing motor. With my balance, I could go onto the river with very choppy water, and know that I would not capsize. I simply shifted my weight to the motion of the boat. Those were days that nobody ever forgets, good times, no great responsibilities, and just enough pocket cash for gas for the car, and the boat, having to sometimes siphon gas from the car to fill the little carry-on tank for the boat.

Yep, when I pass from this life, I'm going to ask for the 20 year old model for my resurrected self.

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What a beautiful memory. My stepdad also had a boat when I was a kid in the 1970's/1980's. He had a 20 foot 1960ish boat with the little steering wheel/console, and it had a Chrysler Marine outboard. He had a smaller Mercury outboard as a backup. Good times! It was fun getting to drive it.
You guys were what we called "rich folks". I grew up in a canoe, spend every summer for my first 17 years in Balsam Lake, Wisconsin in a cabin that these days would be primitive in the extreme. No insulation, the roof always had a leak somewhere, we didn't even have electricity at that cabin until I was about 8 or 9. We played cards in the evening under kerosene lamps. The whole front was a screen porch with nothing but roll up fabric shutters to keep out the weather. But what we lacked in stuff we more than made up for in location. We had 1/4 mile of lakefront and 25 acres of woods that were owned by my maternal grandmother, and back then in the 50's, property lines were just something drawn on a paper in the county office. We roamed at will and never worried about it.

Our canoe was an Old Town mahogany, canvas covered until my father fiberglassed it in the mid 50's. My grandmother bought it new in about 1920 when she was in her 20's. That canoe was our grocery hauler during the week when the car was back in Minnesota for the work week (my grandmother was a teacher and was off all summer, so we stayed with her even when Mom went back to the city). It got us to town and back many, many times. It was our swimming and diving platform, and our fishing craft. We took it out in all sorts of weather as long as there was no lightning. Having lived in that canoe since I was big enough to hold a paddle, capsizing held no fears for me. Life jackets? What are those?

I couldn't begin to guess how many fish we landed in that canoe. Sunfish, bluegills, black crappie, perch, rock bass, largemouth bass, walleye, northern pike, and a few bullheads. We caught turtles from it with a landing net lashed on to a 10 foot cane pole.

Yeah, we were poor in money but incredibly wealthy in life. I only wish I'd had the same appreciation for it then that I do now. Like most kids, I took it for granted. Now that it's long gone, I want it back.
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Old 04-05-2016, 09:15 PM   #86
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What's your favorite camp meal?

Ah, memories. We summered on Lake of the Woods, and until I was in my tweens, we stayed in cabins with outhouses, the original toasters that were probably from the '20s, and wood burning ovens and fireplaces. Later, gas or electric. Didn't matter, LOTW was out there to be swum in, fished in, and we all had a grand time.

Fresh caught walleye, cleaned and cooked either on a little fire on a nearby island, or brought home, where it was cooked in a CI skillet.
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Old 04-16-2016, 03:37 PM   #87
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Ah, memories. We summered on Lake of the Woods, and until I was in my tweens, we stayed in cabins with outhouses, the original toasters that were probably from the '20s, and wood burning ovens and fireplaces. Later, gas or electric. Didn't matter, LOTW was out there to be swum in, fished in, and we all had a grand time.

Fresh caught walleye, cleaned and cooked either on a little fire on a nearby island, or brought home, where it was cooked in a CI skillet.
I'm with you on the walleye / little fire on an island deal. Best fish in the world!

Have you noticed that the walleyes on the Ontario side of Lake of the Woods say "eh" and walleyes on the Minnesota side say "huh?" It's true...

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Old 04-16-2016, 10:13 PM   #88
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I'm with you on the walleye / little fire on an island deal. Best fish in the world!

Have you noticed that the walleyes on the Ontario side of Lake of the Woods say "eh" and walleyes on the Minnesota side say "huh?" It's true...

RD
Wow! It's the same in Michigan. On the Ontario side of the Saint Mary's rapids, they say eh, and on the Michigan side they say Huh. The only difference is that the species are salmon and steelhead. Now go to Lake George, you get the same dynamics, but it's jumbo perch and walley, and a couple species of pike.

As for cooking fish in CI fry pans on little islands, yep, that's about as good as it gets. Gonna have to find a place where I can rent a boat and do that with the grandkids. However, pancakes are best done with lots of trees around in rustic campgrounds.

Seeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 04-16-2016, 10:33 PM   #89
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I'm gonna get smacked here, but I love the freeze dried camping food, so if I can bring that, I'm happy. Beef and rice, chicken and rice, beef and potatoes, anything like that. Then I'll bring along the freeze dried strawberry cheesecake, maybe some eggs, macaroni, and bacon in the can.

I might also bring along some beanie weenies and a few other things in the cooler. I did a lot of backpacking when I was doing SAR and so for now, car camping is the only way I want to get out into the outdoors.
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Old 04-17-2016, 08:25 AM   #90
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This is something I use to do every morning for breakfast. I quit doing it even though everyone loved it. if its just a few of you its OK but sometimes we get 15 people in a group including kids.

First of all get a big pot of water on the fire. I meant a BIG pot. At least a 12 qt. Fill about 2/3 full.

Then get your box of gallon zip lock baggies. Not the cheap ones either. The good ones.

While you are waiting for that to boil Break 3 eggs in a cup or bowl and scramble them. Dump into the baggie and throw in the boiling water.

The reason you only fill the pot 2/3 full is sometimes the top of the baggie sticks out and will melt.

The bags do get a little soft and sometime you have to pull it out and squash the bag around to mix the eggs.

When done just dump on a plate.

You can reuse the bags as many times as you need to but you have to let them cool.

It don't matter how long you leave them in there. You can not over cook them.

I use 3 eggs because that is a normal adult serving. Kids share a big.

If you use paper plates and plastic forks the only dish you have to wash is the bacon pan. (Cast iron pan. I wipe it out, put it in the camper and use it again the next day.)
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Old 04-17-2016, 08:33 AM   #91
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We always get a camp site on the river. My wife loves fresh cat fish. As soon as we get one shes preping the pan.

Foil baking pan with a little olive oil, Onion, taters, green peppers, salt and pepper.

Put in the catfish and in half hour or so we got snacks.

The first catch of the day is usually out of the river and on the fire in 10 minutes or less. If don't get any fresher than that.
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Old 04-17-2016, 12:37 PM   #92
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Jon, do you have a lot of farm hands and if so do you feed them?
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Old 04-18-2016, 07:03 AM   #93
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There are only 3 of us. The boss, my brother and I. Summertime one of my boys and my nephew works for us. Everyone either goes home or the boss takes us to town for dinner.

I do have 6 kids. When they are all here is a chore to feed them. I keep thinking just wait until they all are married and have kids of their own.
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Old 04-18-2016, 08:05 AM   #94
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There are only 3 of us. The boss, my brother and I. Summertime one of my boys and my nephew works for us. Everyone either goes home or the boss takes us to town for dinner.

I do have 6 kids. When they are all here is a chore to feed them. I keep thinking just wait until they all are married and have kids of their own.


To wish, To hope, To dream. To realize! Alas, then you will have a houseful of grandkids. Sorry, but they never really leave.
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Old 04-18-2016, 08:30 AM   #95
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I remember a show from when I was young, "The Real McCoys". Three generations lived in the same farmhouse. The working adults ran the farm, while raising their children, teaching them moral responsibility, and respect, and helping them stay out of trouble. The grandpa helped as he could, but oftentimes felt as a burden to those he once raised and supported. The dynamics were realistic between the three generations, and provided a glimpse of good examples in how families should work together to help each other through the generations.

Sadley, the Family farm rarely exists anymore, and current jobs spread families accross the continent, and even to other countries. Often, we can only keep in touch by phone, Skype, or Facebook. That is a sad substitution for working and playing together, enjoying the love and support that close proximity allows. And the two percent who choreograph our lives tell us that this is progress. I say that we at the hands of powers that seek to destroy the nuclear family, and who manipulate the great waves of people so as to excercise their own power, and obtain untold wealth.

I am not an anarchist, or trouble maker. I served my country for ten years in the U.S. Navy, and have had a job since I was about 11 years of age. I followed the American plan. I am simply wiser now, and not as naive as I once was.

I still believe in the American dream, where a person is honorable, works hard, and reaps the benefits of their efforts. I just wish that the scenario were real. I've struggled all my life, living from pay day to payday. I don't make a bad wage. But with a B.S. E.E.T. Degree, and giving an honest day's work for thrity-pluss years, I should be earning more, and should be allowed some play-time, and more quality time than two to four weeks a year with my children and grandchildren.

But then again, we are told not to lay up for ourselves treasures in this life, but rather treasures in the next. I'm trying to do that and hoping for the best.

For any who read this, DC is a good place to visit every now and again, a place where we can be freinds, and share good recipes, good cooking techniques, and good ideas about anything. It's an uplifting place, if you take pride out of it. We can all be who we really are, and lend a helping hand, or recieve a helping hand.

Seeeeeeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
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Old 04-18-2016, 12:32 PM   #96
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Chief, all through their years of growing up I have always emphasized that "FAMILY" is everything. They got the message early in life. When one child was being picked on by an outsider, the rest of the kids always ran to their defense.
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Old 05-22-2016, 07:50 AM   #97
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First night backpacking food

So on a backpacking trip, usually we are talking dehydrated stuff, bisquick, etc... I try to make up one really good meal, and freeze it in ziplocks, for that first night dinner. Can't last the trip, but the first day (and I try to schedule the first day for a long bit of hard hiking) a really good fuel heavy meal is fantastic.

So here is the recipe for one of my favorites

First day on the trail Ravioli!

I make up my own ravioli for this, but you can substitute store bought. Just make sure they are meaty and awesome, I mean, you are backpacking! No need to scrimp or count calories.

For the dough:

3 cups flour (should be the all purpose variety, I use whole wheat and bread flour interchangeably with this, and the recipe doesn't notice)
4 eggs if you really want to up the protein use five
1tsp salt
2 tbsp olive oil
some water

So the idea here is to add the eggs bit by bit until you have a reasonable dough. At that point roll it out and make little rounds, those are the ravioli, and need stuffing so where we go next is:

Stuffing

OK for this get Medieval. Forget that 99% lean organic free range beef from whole foods. You want ground beef that comes in a tube, should be like 20% fat. Fat is important here. Yeah it might have some horse meat in it, deal.

1 lb questionable ground beef
1tsp cloves
1tsp cayenne pepper
1 tsp oregano
1 finely chopped onion
1tbsp chopped fresh parsley
as much garlic as you can bear
if you want to firm this up with some bread crumbs, or spice it different, I won't complain.

so for obvious this gets cooked in a pan, If you add bread crumbs do it at the end AFTER you drain the fat. One thing is that this, if you took my advice and bought the cheapest fattiest ground beef you can find, will end up with a lot of fat, drain that off and save it.

So congratulations, you now have a rudimentary pasta and a filler for it. Fill little packages of pasta with filler in the usual fashion. Put them in a gallon ziplock and freeze.

So you should end up with a frozen ziplock bag of awesome. That is the ravioli component, we also like sauce with that, right?

Sauce:

So remember that fat we drained off our cheap ground beef? I hope you didn't throw it out! If you did, it is cool, just throw a half a stick of butter in it. (remember we are backpacking, not counting calories, need them)

two cans of Ro-Tel diced tomatoes and chili. And go for the real Ro-Tel, you cheap cheap b'tards You think you are saving by getting the 0.69 off brand version, pay the extra seventy cents worth it. I skimp on my protein, I never compromise on my Ro-tel.

the fat, add in

Basil, fresh, or another herb, can't emphasize enough the importance of this. You are about to eat freeze dried crap for a bit, get some fresh.

a bout a cup of tomato sauce

2 tbsp of lemon juice

So all this mess can go into a bag, the easiest way to deal with it I've found is to keep the sauce and ravioli separate in two bags, combine them in your cookpot at camp. If you spice this right, it will keep for several days on the trail, the idea is to make it acid as all heck so the bugs are unhappy about it. Borrow some ph testing strips from your crazy uncle that does pool maintenance, if it shows up pink or red, you are good.

Happy trails, campers!
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