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Old 04-01-2007, 12:31 PM   #21
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lynan
Kimbaby, the combination of meat, cheese and corn topped with potatos sounds great! Never thought of adding corn.

A question to you all....do you have such a thing as Cottage Pie in the States? I ask because here in sheep country ( New Zealand) a Shepherds Pie is with lamb and a Cottage Pie with beef. Whats in a name, I know ...but I am interested if any of you do a lamb one.
I honestly never heard of it, but would love to try it...
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Old 04-01-2007, 12:33 PM   #22
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Real Poatoes Would Be Great WIth It As Well, I Just Fix This In A Hurry So I Use Instant, But You Can Tweak It To Your Satisfaction:)
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Old 03-23-2008, 07:53 PM   #23
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Chef Ramsay

Saw Chef Ramsay's the F word today. On it he made what he called Shepherd's Pie. It included everything that most of your recipes have except for the seasonings and carrots. Also had wine and beef broth but I cannot remember exactly everything t hat he included. Does anyone have idea where I could get his recipe other than buying one of his cookbooks? He always seems to make everything sound as if it is the best. Thanks.
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Old 03-23-2008, 08:03 PM   #24
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Found It

Okay, I found it. Just had to do little searching, very little. Now t he recipe is metric measurements. I am lost. I know things are changing but could someone give me idea of how to decipher these measurements? for instance 500g lean lamb? 500g is how many pounds? If I copy the recipe I will doing something that is not permitted. I tried couple of time to submit recipe and they wanted notice where I got it and could not remember. Thanks for understanding.
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Old 03-23-2008, 08:23 PM   #25
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Okay, I found it. Just had to do little searching, very little. Now t he recipe is metric measurements. I am lost. I know things are changing but could someone give me idea of how to decipher these measurements? for instance 500g lean lamb? 500g is how many pounds? If I copy the recipe I will doing something that is not permitted. I tried couple of time to submit recipe and they wanted notice where I got it and could not remember. Thanks for understanding.

c'mon 'in the kitchen', drag yourself into the 20th century (the 21st might be a step too far ) 500g is probably GR's way of saying a pound, though it won't matter much.

I'm with Lynan, Shepard's pie is very well defined, it's only you Americans that seem h*ll bent on messing everything up. If you put cheese on a shepard's pie, you get Cumberland pie (I live in Cumberland ), and if you want to put beef and corn in your pie, then call it sumit else, and leave our shepard's pie alone!

Note that I'm not criticizing the pie, just what you call it.
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Old 03-23-2008, 09:07 PM   #26
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DUH - we should have called it "Cow Herder's Pie"

And the name was coined way more than 15 - 20 years ago. When I was like 5 it was called Shepherd's Pie - oh wait - yea, right, that was only about 15 - 20 years ago - NOT!
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Old 03-24-2008, 12:22 AM   #27
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c'mon 'in the kitchen', drag yourself into the 20th century (the 21st might be a step too far ) 500g is probably GR's way of saying a pound, though it won't matter much.

I'm with Lynan, Shepard's pie is very well defined, it's only you Americans that seem h*ll bent on messing everything up. If you put cheese on a shepard's pie, you get Cumberland pie (I live in Cumberland ), and if you want to put beef and corn in your pie, then call it sumit else, and leave our shepard's pie alone!

Note that I'm not criticizing the pie, just what you call it.
snob pie?
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Old 03-24-2008, 01:00 PM   #28
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Ramsay

What nationality is Ramsay? He has the recipe with parmeasan for grating. Would you consider that adding cheese. This recipe is so involved than the ones posted here. Okay he has 250ml red wine and 300ml chicken stock l kg desiree potatoes, what in the world are desiree potatoes? Haven't clue with the measurements here. Guess I will have to catch up with 21st by checking out threads here with measurements. I am lazy, I do like someone to tell me. Chef uses lot of thyme. All these things have to be bought special don't have them in the house.
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Old 03-24-2008, 01:13 PM   #29
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500 g is roughly a pound

250 ml is roughly a cup

300 ml would be about 1 1/4 cups

desiree potatoes are red skinned potatoes.
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Old 03-24-2008, 01:33 PM   #30
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Chef Ramsay is English I do believe.

Remember first and foremost - Google is your friend! For the potatoes - if you go to Google.com and type in desiree potatoes you will find your answer.

Try this site for converting measurements - just click on what's appropriate. There are other charts too through Google.com.
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Old 03-24-2008, 05:26 PM   #31
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ANDY kitchenelf

Thanks for having patience with me. Seems you people have to handle me with fragile thoughts. I am limited it seems when it comes to change. I do appreciate your time Thanks.
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Old 03-25-2008, 09:47 AM   #32
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Chef Ramsay is English I do believe.

snip


GR was born in Scotland, though brought up in England, hence the attitude

Desiree potatoes are neither too fluffy nor too waxy, but use your favourite ones for the mash. Traditionally, shepherd's pie was made from the lamb left over from the Sunday roast, mixed with vegetables in a thick gravy, then topped with mashed potato, and browned in the oven. No cheese.

GR's recipe indicates he is just a cook trying to be a

One maxim which might be followed here, 'don't mess with tradition'.
cheers
Waaza

the beef/corn pie could be called 'colonial pie'.
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Old 03-25-2008, 10:41 AM   #33
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Wow

i truly appreciate all this info regarding the Shepherd's Pie. I do have this leftover lamb that I plan on using for this recipe. However, since the ingredients were with this metric measure really confusing. Lamb is too durn expensive to get the recipe messed up. wazza,you make it with lamb or what do you fix it with? I will just use regular potatoes then since I don't think the store has the desiree potatoes. Wonder if this would make a big difference from the ones Chef used.

Andy, don't you think this metric is really confusing? 300ml 1 1/4 cup? There is no way to relate these measurements. Like starting all over to cook. Just wonder why all these changes? Just hope this Shepherd's Pie turns out after going through all this. Once again I thank you all.
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Old 03-25-2008, 10:53 AM   #34
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ITK:

The metric system is just something new to Americans. It is actually easier to use once you get accustomed to it. Most measuring cups have cups on one side and metric on the other. That makes it a little easier.

Shepherd's pie is one of those traditional recipes that varied from house to house based on what the housewife had on hand that day. It is a dish created to use up leftovers.

It absolutely does not matter what kind of potato you use to make the mashed potato topping. The desiree potatoes are just one person's version of the recipe.

If you want to add cheese to the dish, go ahead. The shepherd's pie police will not break down your door and arrest you.
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Old 03-25-2008, 10:56 AM   #35
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but they may take your pie!
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Old 03-25-2008, 10:57 AM   #36
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If they want my pie, they will have to pry it from my cold dead hands.
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Old 03-25-2008, 11:26 AM   #37
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I'm with Andy on this one, traditional probably meant whatever you had to hand, although:

beef = cottage pie
lamb/mutton/hogat = shepherd's pie
lamb/carrot/cheese = Cumberland pie

and now
beef/corn/cheese = Colonial pie

OK, a little humour makes the world go around....

but how many times have you ordered a dish/meal to find out that it was not what you thought it was, because the chef is lacking knowledge, or has his/her own take on it. I get pretty fed up about it.

And a survey I read about somewhere said that changing just one ingredient was generally accepted by people, but more than one was not, according to the poll. Does this mean that if I change two things in a recipe, it's a new recipe?
Is this just opinion, good taste or 'food law'?
cheers
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Old 03-25-2008, 12:04 PM   #38
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wazaa, i hate to say it, but you'd have a hard time finding a shepard's pie made with lamb here in the states.
since i love lamb, i always look or ask if it's on the menu, but i'm always disappointed to see it made with ground beef. it seems the intracacies have been lost in translation, and any ground meat in gravy, topped with mashed potatoes (and variations therein) is called shepard's pie.

as far as changing ingredients, you could always add your name to the beginning of the dish stating that this is your version, then add the details in the description. such as "kimbaby's shepard's pie".

if nothing else, it could be described as a fertility drug...
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Old 03-25-2008, 01:46 PM   #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by In the Kitchen View Post
What nationality is Ramsay? He has the recipe with parmeasan for grating. Would you consider that adding cheese. This recipe is so involved than the ones posted here. Okay he has 250ml red wine and 300ml chicken stock l kg desiree potatoes, what in the world are desiree potatoes? Haven't clue with the measurements here. Guess I will have to catch up with 21st by checking out threads here with measurements. I am lazy, I do like someone to tell me. Chef uses lot of thyme. All these things have to be bought special don't have them in the house.
Here's a site that will convert measurements from one method to the other: GourmetSleuth - Kitchen Conversion Calculator

I would print out the recipe, then go to the site above, make the conversions, and write them on the recipe. Then you'll be good to go
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Old 03-25-2008, 01:57 PM   #40
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if nothing else, it could be described as a fertility drug...
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