2023 Edition - What are you baking?

The friendliest place on the web for anyone that enjoys cooking.
If you have answers, please help by responding to the unanswered posts.
Another loaf of potato rye, which I started a couple days ago. I don't like to make those usual dishes I make, loaded with onions, garlic, and spices when I'm preparing those cookies, since the aromas can permeate, and sandwiches are something good to have around, along with some greens around, along with some fruits. As soon as the cookies are out of the way, I can get back to my usual cooking.
Another loaf of potato rye, this loaf a larger one in that clay pan. by pepperhead212, on Flickr
 
It does look fussy to make - for the experience yuh gotta say you made it at least once!
Go for it pictonguy!

I've been gifted Panettone several times. Truth to tell, never really saw what all the fuss was about. It was OK but certainly not something I personally would buy much less make.
We had dessert at a neighbor's house years ago and she made panettone bread pudding with amaretto sauce. O.M.G. Incredible. This is the recipe she used.
 
I made another batch of this very large (turned out 90.45 oz of dough) recipe of rye bread today, this one an unusual version, using about 1¼ c of pickle juice in place of some of the water, and adding 2 tsp finely minced dill weed, and 2 tsp dill seed, in place of 1 tb of the caraway. The bread has 3/4 c cornmeal, cooked, which gets very thick, plus it has 2 c mashed potatoes. It has 4 c each rye and WW flours - the original name in the CB, "Dark Pumpernickel", I guess refers to the dark flours, with no white flours at all. I don't make this often, but I have extra room in my freezer now, once all those cookies were baked, and a lot of stuff was used up in the cookies. And one of these I will give to a friend of mine.
The cooked coarse cornmeal, or polenta, and dill seed, dill weed, and caraway seed, for the rye bread. by pepperhead212, on Flickr

Mashed potatoes added to the stirred up cornmeal. by pepperhead212, on Flickr

The almost finished rye dough, just slightly sticking to the bottom of the bowl. by pepperhead212, on Flickr

The "dark pumpernickel", ready to rise 3 times 15 minutes, and fold the dough, then rise 60 minutes. by pepperhead212, on Flickr

The dark pumpernickel, more than doubled. by pepperhead212, on Flickr

The 3 loaves of dark pumpernickel, just over 30 oz each, ready to rise. by pepperhead212, on Flickr

Dark pumpernickel, ready to go into the oven. by pepperhead212, on Flickr

Finished dark pumpernickel. by pepperhead212, on Flickr
 
I am not baking because about a month ago I'd invited my butterscotch bread pudding into two pans and froze one, so that is coming out and just getting warmed up on Christmas.
 
Back
Top Bottom