How do you cook fresh polish sausage?

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rickell

Senior Cook
Joined
Mar 31, 2006
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384
Location
Kansas City
How do you cook fresh polish sausage? My hubby's family from Chicago
sent us some fresh polish sausage. They always boil it first then pan
fry. Wouldn't the boiling take alot of the flavor out? Is this the correct
way to cook the sausage? Don't get me wrong it has alway been wonderful
can't get this good of fresh polish sausage in kc, just wondering if this is the
best way to cook it.
 
That's the way I learned to cook it also. I'm very careful not to puncture the casing. Of course, I've boiled it and then tossed it on the grill...
 
Place that makes it

I called the place that makes this fresh polish sausage. They just told me the way I fixed it was right. They told me to boil it. I feel the same way you do. When they told me it was okay made me wonder why I even called.
 
I usually put some water in the skillet to get it started and by the time the water evaporates, the sausages are heated thru and then just let them brown to your liking.

Hmm, I've never boiled them before putting on the grill, just make sure the heat is med-low to med. and maybe turn up a little to brown if needed.
 
I don't boil. I dont' recall that my Polish relatives boiled, either. I pan fry them over low heat, or grill them over medium heat.

Here are a couple of nice links from a few weeks ago, on the Weber kettle rotisserie. Ambrosia!

Lee
 

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You know, just from my experiences with Czech sausages, I think it really depends on the type of sausage. Some hold up better to pre-boiling than others.
 
QSis said:
Here are a couple of nice links from a few weeks ago, on the Weber kettle rotisserie. Ambrosia!

Lee
Oh man, That picture makes my mouth water. From the looks of the coals it's about 40 minutes to dinner?
 
On closer look I see a few briquettes on the floor of the kettle and smaller briquettes or wood chunks in the drip pan. Can you explain your set up a little?
 
Last edited:
We don't boil.

What we do is put the sausages in a frying pan with a quarter to half inch of water, cover and let simmer/low boil for half an hour or so.

Then we take off the cover, turn up the heat a tad, and let the water evaporate.

Then let the sausages brown.

This was the way a former roomies grandmother from Poland make them, and they always turned out fine.
 
sad to say

I boiled the sausage and let it rest for a bit before i sliced it to pan fry.

the sausage smelled very good but when i sliced it there were so many
chunks of bones it was sad. this is the first time we got the polish sausage
from this family on my husband's side but i tell you what it was bad.
this sausage was made from all the scraps in the kitchen. i am really not
a picky eater at all i love fish with the bones and some times even the skin
but this i could not eat. i did try it and just could not eat anymore.

the baked apples, potatoe pancakes and the home made sauerkraut were
very good.

i know now which family to ask for the best polish sausage from chicago.

the grill pictures look wonderful i too would like a bit of instight on that.
 
Might not technically be boiling, but...

auntdot said:
We don't boil.

What we do is put the sausages in a frying pan with a quarter to half inch of water, cover and let simmer/low boil for half an hour or so.

Then we take off the cover, turn up the heat a tad, and let the water evaporate.

Then let the sausages brown.

This was the way a former roomies grandmother from Poland make them, and they always turned out fine.

this is still steaming.

All the forementioned preperations will work, it depends on what you want for the end result.
 
skilletlicker said:
On closer look I see a few briquettes on the floor of the kettle and smaller briquettes or wood chunks in the drip pan. Can you explain your set up a little?

Hi, skilletlicker,

In this case, we first cooked a pork loin roast on the rotiss, and banked the coals on the sides for indirect cooking. When the roast was done, we lit a second chimney starter half-full of coals, and dumped them in the middle of the drip pan to cook the sausages at a higher temp, to cook direct.

The pork had so little fat and drippings that the coals were fine.

Lee
 
Sorry your polish sausage was bad. Hope you get some better sausage next time. I have usually done my polish sausage on the webber and if we do alot of them , when they are done we take them off the grill and put them in warm beer and onions to keep them hot until they all are done.Also have boiled them in beer and onions during the winter months. then browned in a cast iron pan.
 
bump. this made me hungry tonight. :yum:

sometimes you have to tell the polish guy to step out of the pot and put the sausage back in... bah dum dump, crash! :cool:


but seriously, my wife makes her mom's recipe of polish sausage (which also works with kielbasi) baked with onions, saurkraut, and potatoes.

she steams the sausage a bit but not cooked through and sets it aside. next, she sweats thinly sliced onions in butter and mixes that into the sauerkraut at about an equal ratio, or maybe just a bit more kraut.

while doing this, she parboils peeled and sliced potato rounds (about 1/4 inch thick slices), and drains them.

the kraut/onion is mixed gently with the potatoes and placed in a deep casserole dish. the steamed sausage is nestled into the mixture and it is baked uncovered at i think around 350F until the edges of the kraut and onions begin to crisp and brown, and the sausage is cooked through.

i'm not sure if she dots the top with butter before baking. i'll have to ask.

some people like to sprinkle it with caraway seeds, but we pefer it without.

serve with a spicy brown mustard, and a side of polish rye bread and maslo (polish or slovakian spreadable butter).
 
bump. this made me hungry tonight. :yum:

sometimes you have to tell the polish guy to step out of the pot and put the sausage back in... bah dum dump, crash! :cool:


but seriously, my wife makes her mom's recipe of polish sausage (which also works with kielbasi) baked with onions, saurkraut, and potatoes.

she steams the sausage a bit but not cooked through and sets it aside. next, she sweats thinly sliced onions in butter and mixes that into the sauerkraut at about an equal ratio, or maybe just a bit more kraut.

while doing this, she parboils peeled and sliced potato rounds (about 1/4 inch thick slices), and drains them.

the kraut/onion is mixed gently with the potatoes and placed in a deep casserole dish. the steamed sausage is nestled into the mixture and it is baked uncovered at i think around 350F until the edges of the kraut and onions begin to crisp and brown, and the sausage is cooked through.

i'm not sure if she dots the top with butter before baking. i'll have to ask.

some people like to sprinkle it with caraway seeds, but we pefer it without.

serve with a spicy brown mustard, and a side of polish rye bread and maslo (polish or slovakian spreadable butter).

Pretty much the same at my house.

I prefer the smoked kielbasa made with a combination of pork and beef, but I also cook the fresh sausage.

I add some carrot chunks and a chopped apple. I like to use small boiling onions instead of sliced onions. I don't precook anything. I just put everything into a casserole with a tight fitting lid and let it cook in the oven at 350 for an hour or so.

I'm with you on the rye bread and spicy mustard. I also serve prepared horseradish and a big bowl of ice cold chunky applesauce.

The leftovers are great chopped and fried for breakfast, similar to hash.

You can also just split the sausage, fry it and use the leftover potatoes for home fries.

Don't forget the rye toast!
 
yes, it's fantastic as leftovers.

and when the sausage is gone, i save the remaining kraut, onion, and potato mixture to put on a hot dog a couple of days later since it lasts in the fridge. it ends up being a combo of a standard dog with the kraut, and an italian dog with the potatoes and onions.

:yum:
 
I love me some kraut! Several weeks back I found a great buy on cabbage at the farmers market and made three gallons of sauerkraut. So we've been eating a lot of it.

I've been told by my wife no more sauerkraut this month.... but the month will be over in a few days. :brows:
 
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