It's National Pot Pie Day in the U.S., Saturday, September 23, 2023! What are you making?

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If you have answers, please help by responding to the unanswered posts.
I agree about acronyms being difficult to figure out. Just write it or leave it alone!
That's a PITA. And I can't write out what the "a" stands for in this forum.
which is why I don't use my phone - although I understand why people do or have to.
(you know that one? :LOL:)
Yeah, I was at the beach. Not dragging my laptop there.
 
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FYI, there are keyboard apps available that are pretty good at predictive text. It cuts down on typing time and spelling accuracy considerably. I use Microsoft SwiftKey Keyboard.
I type 90 WPM. Typing words in full on a keyboard isn't an issue but on my phone it's tedious.
 
Jusa, I also typed 90 wpm on a manual typewriter and then more like 120+ on an electric typewriter. Still now, if you don't count the 'oops'. ;) my biggest problem with computers are the changing keyboard spacing. Each new one takes me ages to get used to - and :-pmore difficult with each passing year. :(

GG - I know there are apps available. I've disabled them, as without fail, they either change the meaning or I have to go and change too many things back. As much of a problem as other ways.

msmofet - you've never heard it because you LIVE there. Now, if you lived in the Bronks of New Yoik, you would hear it often. (just kidding, just kidding!)
 
I love pot pies... any sort - with the exception of Steak and Kidney :sick:
About 40 years ago, I knew two people who were definite Anglophiles. They would often discuss something as if longing for it even though neither were from England. Steak and Kidney pie was often mentioned as the answer to "what shall we do for dinner?" I went to the library and picked up a book to copy the recipe for Steak and Kidney pie. Then off to the supermarket and home where I made it.

"What's for dinner?" My reply, "Get Susan!" Susan arrives and says, "Mm! Something smells great!" I pulled out the pie and both said, "Pot Pie?" I replied proudly, "Steak and Kidney pie!" Totally shocked silence follows with a lot of glances back and forth. It was very good! The cookbook was most clear about how to prepare the kidneys to remove any unpleasantness. However, neither of these two could handle anything that contained offal. I thoroughly enjoyed my meal and the side show of watching both delicately dissect their pie to identify the kidneys - and to be honest, they ate most of it. But...a fun memory.

Oh, I never again heard "steak and kidney pie" as a dinner suggestion. Sadly.
 
When you've been used to a full keyboard and you have clumsy fingers that have poor aim, you are frustrated with typing on a phone screen.

Fortunately, I was read a text/email/DM on my phone and can respond on my laptop.
 
Muricans is often used when referring to people from the US. It is used to distinguish them from other Americans, since Canadians and Mexicans and all the people in Central and South America are Americans too. Oops, I left out the people who live in the Caribbean.
 
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When you've been used to a full keyboard and you have clumsy fingers that have poor aim, you are frustrated with typing on a phone screen.

Fortunately, I was read a text/email/DM on my phone and can respond on my laptop.
What is that???
Muricans is often used when referring to people from the US. It is used to distinguish them from other Americans, since Canadians and Mexicans and all the people in Central and South America are Americans too. Oops, I left out the people who live in the Caribbean.
I would refer to people from other than the States as North Americans, or Central/South Americans. If not using that I describe them as Columbian, Mexican, Argentinean, etc.
I'm 78 and had never heard the expression until now.
I think Aunt Bea has the right of it. I think it sounds like rather a derogatory description. I imagine only non-North Americans probably use it.
I’ve always had a smart mouth and a sharp tongue but as I’ve gotten older I try to be mindful that most slang is hurtful or offensive to someone and it’s usually best to leave it alone.
ditto
 
What is that???
This? "Fortunately, I was read a text/email/DM on my phone and can respond on my laptop."

It's a typo. s/b Fortunately, I WHEN read a text/email/DM on my phone I can respond on my laptop.

Also, a DM is a direct message on Facebook.

I hope the answer to your question is in there somewhere.
 
Thanks - didn't know DM,
I know when I get a text answer on my computer - it shows the source not the sender. Can be a bit confusing. I suppose there is a way to get around that but am already in overload about what things can and cannot do, think I'll pass.
I also don't read my emails on my phone. They are there but the signal is blocked - that drove me crazy when I first got them - so quickly blocked it.
In the past couple of years I can only remember once I ever called up an email - and it was one I had already read at home on the 'puter.
 
I'm 78 and had never heard the expression until now.
I think Aunt Bea has the right of it. I think it sounds like rather a derogatory description. I imagine only non-North Americans probably use it.

ditto
Oh I don't care if someone calls me a "Murican" personally. I don't see how it's derogatory. Now if someone called me a cracker (usually a term used for a bigoted Caucasian in the southern US states) I'd take offense. Also don't like being called stupid or b****. But whats wrong with Murican?
 
Oh I don't care if someone calls me a "Murican" personally. I don't see how it's derogatory. Now if someone called me a cracker (usually a term used for a bigoted Caucasian in the southern US states) I'd take offense. Also don't like being called stupid or b****. But whats wrong with Murican?
This is one of many similar definitions from the internet.

WHAT DOES MURICA MEAN?​

Variously facetious, disparaging, or proud in tone, Murica is a slang way of referring to America, implying extreme patriotism extreme patriotism and stereotyping how white southerners might say the word.

I would add that the term implies an ignorant, redneck, gun toting, beer guzzling, racist.

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This is one of many similar definitions from the internet.

WHAT DOES MURICA MEAN?​

Variously facetious, disparaging, or proud in tone, Murica is a slang way of referring to America, implying extreme patriotism extreme patriotism and stereotyping how white southerners might say the word.

I would add that the term implies an ignorant, redneck, gun toting, beer guzzling, racist.

View attachment 66193
Well definitely not me. Except the beer guzzling part and that I was born in the south. But still doesn't bother me.
 
This is one of many similar definitions from the internet.

WHAT DOES MURICA MEAN?​

Variously facetious, disparaging, or proud in tone, Murica is a slang way of referring to America, implying extreme patriotism extreme patriotism and stereotyping how white southerners might say the word.

I would add that the term implies an ignorant, redneck, gun toting, beer guzzling, racist.

View attachment 66193
:LOL: what she said! :LOL:
 
I remember a contestant on the Wheel of Fortune. Pat S. was completely blindsided but still made the best save ever, what a host! The contestant introduced herself with a distinct southern drawl as "I'm a Redneck and proud of it" it was totally hysterical.
 
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