What to do with Brie or Camembert that is getting pungent?

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taxlady

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I love Brie and Camembert. I usually just cut off a piece and eat it. Yes, just like that, no bread, no nothing, just the yummy cheese.

Sometimes it gets a little overripe. A little overripe isn't a problem. More overripe and possibly starting to smell a bit of ammonia, that's where I would like some new ideas. I usually put it on toast with strawberry jam or honey to take the edge off.
 
According to America's T.K. starting to smell ammonia from your cheese is telling you it is time to chuck it!
I've kept cheese over long times many times - have never had an ammonia smell. Often just orange, grey, green will turn up, this is the first time I've heard of ammonia - interesting.
 
According to America's T.K. starting to smell ammonia from your cheese is telling you it is time to chuck it!
I've kept cheese over long times many times - have never had an ammonia smell. Often just orange, grey, green will turn up, this is the first time I've heard of ammonia - interesting.
If it starts with the coloured mould, I chuck it. But, a bit of ammonia smell, nope. What does ATK will happen if I eat it with ammonia smell. I'm not talking about a strong ammonia smell and I also want ideas for when it doesn't have ammonia smell, but is just quite pungent.
 
Here is a partial comment on the cheese...
"When the cheese is wrapped tightly (as with plastic wrap), these byproducts can be trapped and concentrated over time, resulting in unfamiliar or even unpleasant smells that can be quite strong when the cheese is first unwrapped. But, Gurdal says, letting the cheese sit unwrapped at room temperature for 1 hour before serving (which you should do, anyway, since the flavors are muted in chilled cheeses) should allow those smells to dissipate. However, if the ammonia smell persists after the cheese has aired for an hour, discard it. Other warning signs of spoilage are gray, orange, or brown spots of mold (inspect the edges and sides)."

So perhaps all you need to do is unwrap for awhile.
As to suggestions... I also just eat as is, or crackers, baguette. Never lasts much longer than that.
Have some right now - guess I didn't "test feel" very well. I like it a bit softer than this one I got. When they are not soft enough I don't think they have much flavour.
I go thru the bins squeezing the Brie! LOL!
 
I'm talking about the brie that is sitting out at room temperature, under a cheese bell. This is the stuff that was less pungent when I started eating it. I don't want to have to plan an hour ahead to eat my brie. If I did that, it would be going off frequently. The extra pungent is something that develops over a few days or longer. I was not talking about any smells that I encounter when I unwrap the cheese. That's a whole 'nuther story.
 
Here is a partial comment on the cheese...
"When the cheese is wrapped tightly (as with plastic wrap), these byproducts can be trapped and concentrated over time, resulting in unfamiliar or even unpleasant smells that can be quite strong when the cheese is first unwrapped. But, Gurdal says, letting the cheese sit unwrapped at room temperature for 1 hour before serving (which you should do, anyway, since the flavors are muted in chilled cheeses) should allow those smells to dissipate. However, if the ammonia smell persists after the cheese has aired for an hour, discard it. Other warning signs of spoilage are gray, orange, or brown spots of mold (inspect the edges and sides)."

So perhaps all you need to do is unwrap for awhile.
As to suggestions... I also just eat as is, or crackers, baguette. Never lasts much longer than that.
Have some right now - guess I didn't "test feel" very well. I like it a bit softer than this one I got. When they are not soft enough I don't think they have much flavour.
I go thru the bins squeezing the Brie! LOL!
Do you always manage to eat all of the brie before it gets pungent?
 
I understood what you were saying. True, the article was just about when unwrapping. I thought maybe you were re-wrapping the cheese and just perhaps that was why the odour was coming out.

No, I don't finish it all in one sitting (well, almost never) and yes, I do rewrap, in the same plastic if possible or if that is really mangled then I throw it in a baggie. It would be better if I left it out but I never know when I'm going to have more. Two more reasons for not leaving it out is -yes, it might go moldy and two "out of sight, out of mind" philosophy - I would just keep eating a chunk every time I walked by. Not because I need a snack/lunch/dinner etc. but just because it's there.
 
Yes, it is hard to plan ahead. I don't either. Which is why I try to buy the ripest/softest/gooiest brie I can find.
 
Baking spicy brie or camembert with the addition of sweetness (like honey or blueberry jam) and nuts creates an amazing flavor combo. Bake them in the oven at 180 degrees until the cheese becomes soft and oozy.
 
Baking spicy brie or camembert with the addition of sweetness (like honey or blueberry jam) and nuts creates an amazing flavor combo. Bake them in the oven at 180 degrees until the cheese becomes soft and oozy.
180°C or 180°F?

Until the cheese becomes soft and oozy? The brie is already soft and oozy when it gets pungent.
 
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