What's the difference between sweet & hot paprika?

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carnivore

Senior Cook
Joined
Feb 22, 2003
Messages
291
Location
the great fly-over
I use paprika a LOT, but many times, i see the distinction "sweet paprika" or "hot paprika" in my recipes.
I don't know about you guys, but at all the grocery stores i shop at, they only have "Paprika".
So, 2 questions:
1) Where do you get "sweet" or "hot" paprika?
2) If it's just labeled "Paprika", does that mean that it's a combination of the two, or that it is one or the other?
thanks
 

kitchenelf

Chef Extraordinaire
Joined
Feb 21, 2002
Messages
19,722
Location
North Carolina
Being Hungarian and all you'd think I'd know my Paprika!! LOL

I don't really know if plain paprika is a combination - I know I have sweet Hungarian in my cabinets now - and I know hot paprika is hot, a little goes a long way!

Now I'm going to have to do some investigation!
 

oldcoot

Senior Cook
Joined
Feb 4, 2003
Messages
487
Location
USA,California
Carnivore, this web site gives a lengthy and detailed dissertation on all aspects of Paprika - more than anyone needs to know.:)

http://www-ang.kfunigraz.ac.at/~katzer/engl/generic_frame.html?Caps_ann.html

In glancing through it, I got the impression that most paprika is ground from dried Bell peppers, but that a number of other peppers are used, giving a wide range of sweet or hot paprikas.

Chiles seem to have originated in the Western Hemisphere and were transplanted ot Europe and Asia. Hungary has a climate appropriate for their version of the Bell pepper, giving rise to the fame of Hungareian Paprika.
 

LMJ

Senior Cook
Joined
Apr 4, 2004
Messages
216
Location
Kent, Ohio
I like to use the sweet stuff myself. I just add a little crushed red pepper to the recipe if I need more heat. :)

The real Hungarian stuff like Pride of Szeged is a MUST. The South American or Spanish stuff just doesn't taste the same. Maybe Romanian, Serbian or Croation might be the same just as a function of geography, I dunno.
 

kyles

Head Chef
Joined
Dec 13, 2003
Messages
1,181
Location
UK
To ring the changes, there is also smoked parika, which is divine in soups and casseroles. We can't get liquid smoke in these here parts, so I search for anything with a smoky flavour. I found some hickory smoked salt the other day, and that is also delicious.
 

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