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Old 12-07-2021, 04:40 AM   #1
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Leaving cooked food outside the fridge for more than needed

if you leave a stew or rice with the pot open after cooking that can be cooled in 30 minutes, for longer periods like one hour or more.
does this mean that some bacteria can enter the food?


if yes, does this bacteria will shorten the time that the food can be stored in the fridge



thank you

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Old 12-07-2021, 05:15 AM   #2
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Quote:
The temperature danger zone

Bacteria grow best in food in the temperature range between 135°F – 41°F (57°C – 5°C). This range is so effective for bacteria growth that it’s called the temperature danger zone.
As food is cooled, it passes through the temperature danger zone, giving bacteria time to multiply. If left out to cool, cooked food can become unsafe in a matter of hours. The cooling step gives bacteria a chance to multiply to dangerous levels—if bacteria growth isn’t controlled while food cools. That’s why the FDA guidelines are so effective. These guidelines ensure that food passes through the temperature danger zone quickly so bacteria don’t have a chance to make food unsafe.
https://www.statefoodsafety.com/Reso...ooling-process


In the US, these are the food safety regulations/guidance.


You have two questions, to the first one, can food that is cooled for 1/2 hour or longer have bacteria enter?



The article doesn't actually say bacteria enters. It says bacteria can multiply. But I would say, also that bacteria can enter depending on whether it is covered or stirred (is the spoon it is stirred with clean or bacteria free?), and it can multiply.


The second question about bacteria shortening the time it can be stored in the fridge. I'd say yes but the article doesn't actually address that question.



The longer food takes to cool down to room temperature, or is left to cool down at room temperature, the more likely bacteria is affecting it while it is being stored in the refrigerator. (refrigeration and freezing slows bacteria growth but does not stop it entirely) A food like rice that cooled for 4 hours to room temperature (sitting out) would most likely go bad in the fridge faster than a food like rice only cooled for 30 minutes at room temperature (sitting out) and then refrigerated.



These are considered, common sense, but the regulations are used in restaurants and food at home is no different when it comes to outcomes (is the food safe?).


Ideally, cool it to room temperature, 70 deg F, within 2 hours, cool it to less than 41 deg F within the next 4 hours in the refrigerator.


I hope that helps.
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Old 12-07-2021, 09:26 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blissful View Post
....
These are considered, common sense, but the regulations are used in restaurants and food at home is no different when it comes to outcomes (is the food safe?).


Ideally, cool it to room temperature, 70 deg F, within 2 hours, cool it to less than 41 deg F within the next 4 hours in the refrigerator.


I hope that helps.
Ditto the entire post of blissful, I think the most important take on this is the 2 hour cooling at room temperature and common sense.
Throw it in the fridge to cool the balance.

Many times you will read ... "when it has reached room temperature, transfer to the fridge..." But this doesn't address the fact it often stumps some people when something is extra large or thick or whatever... and is still not 'room temperature' for several hours.

So now you know, 2 hours room, then fridge. If it makes you feel better about not putting something 'hot' into the fridge, repackage it into smaller containers. (yes, more handling, more chance of contamination, but again, I will assume you have common sense and use clean containers, work quickly, and are probably going to consume within a reasonable length of time (3/4 days?)).
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Old 12-07-2021, 10:24 AM   #4
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Originally Posted by dragnlaw View Post
Ditto the entire post of blissful, I think the most important take on this is the 2 hour cooling at room temperature and common sense.

Throw it in the fridge to cool the balance.



[bold]Many times you will read ... "when it has reached room temperature, transfer to the fridge..." But this doesn't address the fact it often stumps some people when something is extra large or thick or whatever... and is still not 'room temperature' for several hours.[/bold]



So now you know, 2 hours room, then fridge. If it makes you feel better about not putting something 'hot' into the fridge, repackage it into smaller containers. (yes, more handling, more chance of contamination, but again, I will assume you have common sense and use clean containers, work quickly, and are probably going to consume within a reasonable length of time (3/4 days?)).
And that's why the temperature blissful mentioned is important to remember - cool down the food to 70F within two hours, to the center (of soup or stew, for example). Sometimes people aren't sure what "room temperature" means. For this purpose, it's 70F.

When I was in culinary school (briefly), we had to put a large pot of stock in a sink filled with ice water and stir it until it measured 70F in several places on an instant-read thermometer.
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Old 12-07-2021, 04:15 PM   #5
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i will read it fully tomorrow
tnx
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Old 12-07-2021, 04:48 PM   #6
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Originally Posted by GotGarlic View Post

When I was in culinary school (briefly), we had to put a large pot of stock in a sink filled with ice water and stir it until it measured 70F in several places on an instant-read thermometer.

Whenever I make soup or stew, I put the pot (leftovers) in a sink of cold water to cool it down quickly. Sometimes I have to change the water a couple of times, but it's worth it, in terms of safety.
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Old 12-09-2021, 01:16 PM   #7
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thank you all
it is verry interesting




i want to also say that i often cool it for about 30 minutes and then refrigirate so the cooling is faster


i also stir it so that inside and edges aren't having a big difference in temperature


i used to cool in cold water in the sink in the past and maybe i better return to this method too.....


have a nice weekenddd
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