"Discover Cooking, Discuss Life."

Go Back   Discuss Cooking - Cooking Forums > Recipes & Ingredients > Soups, Stews & Casseroles > Soups
Click Here to Login
Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
 
Old 11-12-2013, 02:51 PM   #1
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec
Posts: 24,731
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
Roasted Root Vegi Bisque

I just made this for lunch. I licked the ladle. I ate too much, it was that good.

mixed root vegis (no beets, they overwhelm it)
garlic (leave the skin on the cloves)
some onion
a few hot peppers, seeded

Cut vegis in large chunks
toss with olive oil
line a couple of cookie sheets/jelly roll pans with foil
put carrots, peppers, garlic and any smaller pieces on one sheet and the bigger pieces on the other sheet
roast at 350F/175C for about 15-20 minutes
check on the vegis and take out the smaller piece tray if it is done
flip the vegis on the other tray and continue roasting another 10-20 minutes

The vegis should have some very dark bits

take the skins off the garlic cloves

put everything in a pot and almost cover with vegi stock and/or coconut milk (and water, if needed)

simmer for 10 minutes
puree with immersion blender or blender (be careful of hot spattering soup)
add more liquid if it is too thick
season with salt

__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-13-2013, 01:01 AM   #2
Executive Chef
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Mostly in my head
Posts: 2,601
This sounds good! Maybe I'll have to do this one with Sprout for a lunch.
__________________
Just because something has a duck bill doesn't mean it's a platypus. It might just be a duck.
Roger Miller: You can't roller skate in a buffalo heard, but you can be happy if you've a mind to.
purple.alien.giraffe is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-13-2013, 01:24 AM   #3
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Cheryl J's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: California
Posts: 10,088
Sounds good. I am so in soup mode these days. Thanks for the recipe taxlady.
__________________
Grandchildren fill the space in your heart you never knew was empty.
Cheryl J is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-13-2013, 09:24 AM   #4
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec
Posts: 24,731
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
I hope you guys enjoy it. I have always used both vegi stock and coconut milk. If I didn't have a can of coconut milk, I would grate some creamed coconut into the soup. The coconut milk seems to add a lovely, creaminess to the soup.
__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-13-2013, 02:28 PM   #5
Chef Extraordinaire
 
Cheryl J's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: California
Posts: 10,088
It sure does, taxlady...the first time I made a butternut squash soup with coconut milk, I thought I was in heaven.
__________________
Grandchildren fill the space in your heart you never knew was empty.
Cheryl J is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-14-2013, 10:25 AM   #6
Chef Extraordinaire
 
kadesma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: california
Posts: 21,371
Tax just saw your recipe it looks so tasty. I've been craving soup so thank you for one that will make me smile.
kades
__________________
HEAVEN is Cade, Ethan,Carson, and Olivia,Alyssa,Gianna
kadesma is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 11-15-2013, 12:31 AM   #7
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec
Posts: 24,731
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
Quote:
Originally Posted by kadesma View Post
Tax just saw your recipe it looks so tasty. I've been craving soup so thank you for one that will make me smile.
kades
I hope you like it as much as I do.
__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2015, 04:08 PM   #8
Master Chef
 
Mad Cook's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: North West England
Posts: 5,134
Quote:
Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
I just made this for lunch. I licked the ladle. I ate too much, it was that good.

mixed root vegis (no beets, they overwhelm it)
garlic (leave the skin on the cloves)
some onion
a few hot peppers, seeded

Cut vegis in large chunks
toss with olive oil
line a couple of cookie sheets/jelly roll pans with foil
put carrots, peppers, garlic and any smaller pieces on one sheet and the bigger pieces on the other sheet
roast at 350F/175C for about 15-20 minutes
check on the vegis and take out the smaller piece tray if it is done
flip the vegis on the other tray and continue roasting another 10-20 minutes

The vegis should have some very dark bits

take the skins off the garlic cloves

put everything in a pot and almost cover with vegi stock and/or coconut milk (and water, if needed)

simmer for 10 minutes
puree with immersion blender or blender (be careful of hot spattering soup)
add more liquid if it is too thick
season with salt
Thanks Taxi
__________________
Don’t look for the light at the end of the tunnel. Stomp along and switch the bl**dy thing on yourself.
Mad Cook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2015, 05:02 PM   #9
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec
Posts: 24,731
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
I have learned to be careful with the hot peppers. They burn easily, but a little char is okay. I only add one to the bisque to start with. They vary so much in heat that I only add more if the first doesn't make it as hot as I like. Until I figured that out, we had liquid fire a couple of times, using the same quantity of hot peppers as had been perfect on previous occasions.
__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2015, 05:23 PM   #10
Chef Extraordinaire
 
jennyema's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Boston and Cape Cod
Posts: 10,131
Looks delish!!
__________________
Less is not more. More is more and more is fabulous.
jennyema is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2015, 05:31 PM   #11
Master Chef
 
Mad Cook's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Location: North West England
Posts: 5,134
Quote:
Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
I have learned to be careful with the hot peppers. They burn easily, but a little char is okay. I only add one to the bisque to start with. They vary so much in heat that I only add more if the first doesn't make it as hot as I like. Until I figured that out, we had liquid fire a couple of times, using the same quantity of hot peppers as had been perfect on previous occasions.
I'll be careful with the hot peppers. Chillies do not like me!
__________________
Don’t look for the light at the end of the tunnel. Stomp along and switch the bl**dy thing on yourself.
Mad Cook is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2015, 06:03 PM   #12
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec
Posts: 24,731
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
I forgot that I took photos:





__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-27-2015, 10:55 AM   #13
Executive Chef
 
RPCookin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Logan County, Colorado
Posts: 2,860
Quote:
Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
I have learned to be careful with the hot peppers. They burn easily, but a little char is okay. I only add one to the bisque to start with. They vary so much in heat that I only add more if the first doesn't make it as hot as I like. Until I figured that out, we had liquid fire a couple of times, using the same quantity of hot peppers as had been perfect on previous occasions.
The hard part about trying to follow a recipe which just states "hot peppers" is that not all hot peppers are created equal - not by a considerable margin - and not all people have the same tolerance to spicy foods. User beware is my motto. Starting slowly and adding to taste can be critical. The relative heat can be controlled further by partially or completely removing the seeds and veins in the core of the pepper before cooking.

A jalapeño that I can't take a bite out of when whole, is only mildly spicy when seeded and cored. I've had some which have no heat at all after cleaning, but still great flavor. I just had a whole jalapeño finely chopped in my scrambled eggs for breakfast, and since I removed the core before chopping, it added less heat than a dash of Tabasco. I've had spicier dishes when I added too much black pepper.
__________________
Rick
RPCookin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-27-2015, 11:45 AM   #14
Head Chef
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: Over the rainbow
Posts: 1,272
Great stuff Tax and I love the photos . You have reminded me of a Jamaican soup that I must make again which is similar . my favourite Chillie pepper is a scotch bonnet.
Gravy Queen is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-27-2015, 11:52 AM   #15
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec
Posts: 24,731
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gravy Queen View Post
Great stuff Tax and I love the photos . You have reminded me of a Jamaican soup that I must make again which is similar . my favourite Chillie pepper is a scotch bonnet.
Scotch Bonnets are da bomb. They have a lovely fruity flavour and heat up the wazoo. If I were using Scotch bonnets in this recipe, I would probably start with 1/2 or 1/4 of a pepper.
__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-21-2020, 01:28 PM   #16
Certified/Certifiable
 
Chief Longwind Of The North's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: USA,Michigan
Posts: 10,676
Quote:
Originally Posted by taxlady View Post
I just made this for lunch. I licked the ladle. I ate too much, it was that good.

mixed root vegis (no beets, they overwhelm it)
garlic (leave the skin on the cloves)
some onion
a few hot peppers, seeded
Taxzi, the definition of bisque -

Wiki - Bisque is a smooth, creamy, highly seasoned soup of French origin, classically based on a strained broth (coulis) of crustaceans.[1] It can be made from lobster, langoustine, crab, shrimp, or crayfish.

https://www.etymonline.com/word/bisque

Bisque involves seafood. However, whatever you ant o call itt, your recipe looks great.

Seeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
__________________
“No amount of success outside the home can compensate for failure within the home…"

Check out my blog for the friendliest cooking instruction on the net. Go ahead. You know you want to.- https://gwnorthsfamilycookin.wordpress.com/
Chief Longwind Of The North is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-21-2020, 01:55 PM   #17
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec
Posts: 24,731
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
Quote:
Originally Posted by Chief Longwind Of The North View Post
Taxzi, the definition of bisque -

Wiki - Bisque is a smooth, creamy, highly seasoned soup of French origin, classically based on a strained broth (coulis) of crustaceans.[1] It can be made from lobster, langoustine, crab, shrimp, or crayfish.

https://www.etymonline.com/word/bisque

Bisque involves seafood. However, whatever you ant o call itt, your recipe looks great.

Seeeeya; Chief Longwind of the North
I have that same argument with a Portuguese friend every time I mention it. But, it is thick and creamy and highly seasoned. It's what it was called when I came across the recipe.

And as long as people call those American pastries "Danish pastry", and call some preparations of shrimp "scampi" (a different crustacean from shrimp), I won't fuss too much about using the word "bisque" for this soup.
__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-21-2020, 02:17 PM   #18
Chef Extraordinaire
 
GotGarlic's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Southeastern Virginia
Posts: 24,914
Language and recipes evolve, like everything else. From https://www.thespruceeats.com/what-is-bisque-995579

"The main characteristic of a bisque is that it is smooth and has a velvety texture. Most recipes will include a wine and cream to give it its signature flavor and texture. But it's not merely the choice of ingredient that makes bisque different from other types of soups. It’s also the technique for utilizing that ingredient, including the parts you can't eat, making a bisque what it is.

"Evolution of Bisque
"Authentic recipes for bisque actually ground the shells of the crustacean into a fine paste, using that to thicken the soup. Nowadays, it is more common to use rice as a thickener. In the more distant past, the word "bisque" encompassed soups made from quail or pigeon, sometimes with chunks of crayfish meat added. However, more recently in the culinary world, it has become quite common to see the word bisque used to describe any puréed soup, whether made from crustacean or vegetable, cream-based or thickened with roux."
__________________
Anyplace where people argue about food is a good place.
~ Anthony Bourdain, Parts Unknown, 2018
GotGarlic is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-22-2020, 09:12 PM   #19
Senior Cook
 
Kevin86's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Ontario
Posts: 353
We do this but we take the chopped veggies and toss them in a bit of oil and a bunch of herbs and spices to roast takes it to the next level
__________________
Kevin
Kevin86 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-22-2020, 10:21 PM   #20
Chef Extraordinaire
 
taxlady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Location: near Montreal, Quebec
Posts: 24,731
Send a message via Skype™ to taxlady
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kevin86 View Post
We do this but we take the chopped veggies and toss them in a bit of oil and a bunch of herbs and spices to roast takes it to the next level
Don't the herbs get burnt while being roasted?
__________________
May you live as long as you wish and love as long as you live.
Robert A. Heinlein
taxlady is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
recipe, roast

Roasted Root Vegi Bisque I just made this for lunch. I licked the ladle. I ate too much, it was that good. mixed root vegis (no beets, they overwhelm it) garlic (leave the skin on the cloves) some onion a few hot peppers, seeded Cut vegis in large chunks toss with olive oil line a couple of cookie sheets/jelly roll pans with foil put carrots, peppers, garlic and any smaller pieces on one sheet and the bigger pieces on the other sheet roast at 350F/175C for about 15-20 minutes check on the vegis and take out the smaller piece tray if it is done flip the vegis on the other tray and continue roasting another 10-20 minutes The vegis should have some very dark bits take the skins off the garlic cloves put everything in a pot and almost cover with vegi stock and/or coconut milk (and water, if needed) simmer for 10 minutes puree with immersion blender or blender (be careful of hot spattering soup) add more liquid if it is too thick season with salt 3 stars 1 reviews
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off




All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:35 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.