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caseydog

Master Chef
Joined
Jan 19, 2017
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Location
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When I came to DC about 30 minutes ago, I got a black and white screen telling me "dicusscooking.com is verifying you are human." I've never seen that before. Is than a function of the forum, or do I need to check my MacBook for malware?

CD
 
caseydog, thanks for the confirmation. I was beginning to have some doubts.

Yeah, as soon as I switched my VPN to an American entry point, the message stopped happening.

I sometimes switch to other countries to access websites I couldn't access otherwise, but I didn't switch my computer to Japan, at least not intentionally.

CD
 
The browser check was a spam prevention thing and is automated. It happens sometimes when vpns or when you login for odd locations that historically have lots of spam bots. Glad to hear you are human, however. ;)
 
Yeah, as soon as I switched my VPN to an American entry point, the message stopped happening.

I sometimes switch to other countries to access websites I couldn't access otherwise, but I didn't switch my computer to Japan, at least not intentionally.

CD
celebrate the technology - and gird your loins.....

web sites can and do read/capture your IP address. this is a good and a bad thing.
with the advent of so so so many "free" VPN services, you may be subject to rejection at way whole lotta' sites.

most of the popular browsers offer "free VPN" masking - so, , , essentially identifying fraudsters/spammers/et.al. is no longer possible by IP source.

paid IP masking sites allow one to specify one's location - you appear to have that in hand.
which can be a really good thing if one wants to watch the latest Doctor Who stuff - the
BBC thinks they can hide it . . . . (ok, ok, it's the only first hand 'issue' I can relate . . .)
 
celebrate the technology - and gird your loins.....

web sites can and do read/capture your IP address. this is a good and a bad thing.
with the advent of so so so many "free" VPN services, you may be subject to rejection at way whole lotta' sites.

most of the popular browsers offer "free VPN" masking - so, , , essentially identifying fraudsters/spammers/et.al. is no longer possible by IP source.

paid IP masking sites allow one to specify one's location - you appear to have that in hand.
which can be a really good thing if one wants to watch the latest Doctor Who stuff - the
BBC thinks they can hide it . . . . (ok, ok, it's the only first hand 'issue' I can relate . . .)

As much as I traveled for business, a VPN was essential, and I wanted a really good one, and didn't mid paying for it.

The location choice ability is for just the kind of thing you mentioned. The BBC is fond of blocking non-Brits from access to things... like Doctor Who.

CD
 
Can we exchange opinions on what are the best VPNs you use? I don't use VPNs but would like to learn more about them.
 
I work in food safety and cosmetics, so a very different argument from VPNs. Can you please explain why it is useful (or important) to use a VPN? Or maybe someone can open a new topic on this? It will certainly be useful to us as well, who deal with nutrition at an international level.
 
VPN = Virtual Private Network
signals from your computer - the usual wireless connections - are "encrypted" so only your computer and the VPN you are connected to can see the data "in plain text" so to speak....
not using a VPN, at your home/office/public wifi access , , , with minor technical skills, nasty people can "read" the same data you are receiving&sending.

any place you login, the nasty people can capture your user id and password, for example. right now, from my home desk, I can "see" seven different wifi networks in the neighborhood . . . they are all "locked" - i.e. a password is required to access those networks, but in a public setting passwords are often not required, the data is "open" and accessible to anyone who wants to be a nasty person.

the second benefit - your computer is connected to a VPN server, which acts as a relay station between you and the site. the VPN 'displays' as a different IP address than your computer. (there is software you can put on your computer to do this without using a VPN . . . ) your IP "tells" the site you are connecting to "where" you are, geographically.
so if the BBC will not let you see the latest Doctor Who series, you can set you IP to (falsely) report you are logging in from London . . . which would seem to be a neat solution, except that places like the BBC are prone to keeping up with which IPs are associated with VPN servers, and block them comma comma anyway . . .
 
Great, I understand. I travel often, and at the airport I use my notebook occasionally. So I would prefer that "software you can put on your computer to do this without using a VPN". What's his name and where can I find him?
 
I hardly ever watch television, and this might help me because some of the studies I send are confidential.
 
Great, I understand. I travel often, and at the airport I use my notebook occasionally. So I would prefer that "software you can put on your computer to do this without using a VPN". What's his name and where can I find him?
you'll want to purchase a VPN "subscription" - because the software I mentioned is not a VPN, it just "lies" about your IP address, nothing is encrypted/secure.

FireFox (and others) have a built in no cost VPN 'feature' - but I don't know how wide area availability. the freebies generally do not have the "fake my IP as from London" abilities.

most companies use VPNs - if you're logging into a company site, you may already be "protected" - the IT people can advise.

otherwise check out the various commercial VPN to see which have coverage and features that work for you.
 
If you travel regularly, you really need a VPN. Airports are the most insecure places to log into wifi. Hotels and restaurants with wifi are not much better. Hackers prey on people logging into wifi networks in these kind of places.

I have Nord VPN on all of my devices, since I bought a multi device subscription. It is most important on my MacBook, iPad and iPhone, which travel with me, but I like having it on my iMac at home, too, even though I have a pretty solid firewall on my home network.

One of my customers for several years was a network security company, and they gave me a lot of helpful guidance for my own online security.

CD
 
Thank you all very much. Your answers were very exhaustive and complete. I will purchase a VPN right away.
 
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