Parsley

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blissful

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Mar 25, 2008
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I cut all of our parsley today. I have enough dehydrated so I washed it, destemmed it, and then chopped it in the food processor. I put the fluffy chopped parsley packed tightly in 1 cup flat plastic containers, in the freezer, 5 cups in all. That will green up anything I make this winter. Soups stews sauces and dressings.
 

Roll_Bones

Master Chef
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Oct 19, 2013
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Southeast US
I did not do well with parsley this year. Actually its my first time trying to grow parsley. The seeds said to soak them before planting. Do you soak your seeds?
Any suggestions for me? I will try again next spring. I have everything a gardener should have including many years of experience. TIA....
 

Marlingardener

Senior Cook
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unincorporated area
Roll-Bones, soaking parsley seed makes it difficult to plant. The seed is so small you get clumps instead of individual seeds.
I've had good luck with planting dry seeds, 3 or 4 per cell, in small 6 or 9 cell starters using a good starting soil, and then watering thoroughly. They may not germinate as fast as wet seeds, but I also don't get 20 coming up in a clump!
Parsley freezes well, as Blissful said. I always plant more parsley than we could possibly use, and we run out shortly after Christmas.
Parsley is a cool season herb. We get a spring/early summer batch, and then it dies out. We replant about now, mid-September, and hope for a fall harvest.
Don't give up on parsley, and plant the large leaf Italian parsley. More taste even though it isn't as "cute" as the curly parsley.
 

blissful

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Mar 25, 2008
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i plant the seeds dry, but they seem to take a long time to germinate. A long time to keep the surface wet. We keep it in a raised bed we call the lettuce garden, and we have a cold frame cover we use in spring/fall/winter. Since it comes back the next year, (because it is in the cold frame) we took some that, that came back in the spring and moved them into the left side of the lettuce garden and we planted seeds there. So we have both last year's plants and new plants.

I don't know types of parsley in terms of knowing how they taste or what is best to plant. I looked up the type we planted, it was cheap Livingston seeds, non gmo curly type.
 

blissful

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This must be a picture from last year, since the parsley is still on the right side of the lettuce garden. It's the green stuff in the back-upper portion of the picture.
onionsprouts-004.jpg
 

pepperhead212

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Since parsley takes sooooo long to germinate, I sprout them, before planting. Sounds crazy, I know, but it really is a pain to keep it moist for 3 weeks, and they start sprouting in just 8 days - even less when soaked in GA-3. I don't use a lot of parsley, and it's not one of those herbs I dry or freeze - in the winter, I grow it in the hydroponics.

I just soak them overnight, then put them in a petri dish, with a layer of damp paper towels, 6-8 thick. Then I watch for the sprouts, and transfer them to a pot, with a pair of tweezers.

I knew I'd find a photo of those of I looked! Not sprouted yet, however.
More seeds going into the IP experiment - parsley, zaatar, cutting celery, and hoja santa. by pepperhead212, on Flickr
 

taxlady

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I have no idea why this showed up under "new posts", since the most recent post was in 2018. I have grown parsley. I bought it already growing. It spread, a lot. I harvested what I needed and left the plants in the ground, because I'm lazy. It's a biennial plant. The next year it came back, but it's different in its second year. I could still use the leaves, but there were fewer of them. It made flowers and the flower dropped seeds. The next year, I got a lot more parsley. The third year I had both 1st year and 2nd year parsley. It kept coming back for quite a few years, with next to no input from me. Eventually it quit coming back. That may have been because other plants moved in and I didn't do anything about it.
 

pepperhead212

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That's what I hear about a lot of people doing, TL. Eventually it reseeds itself every year, and they never have to do anything! With me, I'd probably have more weeds, reseeding themselves, however.
 

GotGarlic

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Southeastern Virginia
One day soon, when the daytime weather is consistently in the 70s, I'm going to get some parsley starts from the Feed & Seed Store and plant them for the winter. Unless I see volunteers that we can transplant where we want them. I haven't seen any yet.
 

taxlady

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I have no idea why this showed up under "new posts", since the most recent post was in 2018. I have grown parsley. I bought it already growing. It spread, a lot. I harvested what I needed and left the plants in the ground, because I'm lazy. It's a biennial plant. The next year it came back, but it's different in its second year. I could still use the leaves, but there were fewer of them. It made flowers and the flower dropped seeds. The next year, I got a lot more parsley. The third year I had both 1st year and 2nd year parsley. It kept coming back for quite a few years, with next to no input from me. Eventually it quit coming back. That may have been because other plants moved in and I didn't do anything about it.
Yeah, I had both first year and second year parsley, every single year for quite a while. It just kept coming back. It kept going for maybe 12 or 14 years. I think it was the lamium that knocked it out. Those are really pretty flowers, but they are in the mint family, so they spread like crazy. By then I wasn't really doing much with my little garden, so I just let them go and eventually, the parsley quit coming back. The chives are still doing fine. I planted a little pot of them back in about 2004. I had some of those in tonight's supper.

This was supposed to be a reply to Pepperhead212. I'm still getting used to the new forum software.
 

Roll_Bones

Master Chef
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Oct 19, 2013
Messages
5,540
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Roll-Bones, soaking parsley seed makes it difficult to plant. The seed is so small you get clumps instead of individual seeds.
I've had good luck with planting dry seeds, 3 or 4 per cell, in small 6 or 9 cell starters using a good starting soil, and then watering thoroughly. They may not germinate as fast as wet seeds, but I also don't get 20 coming up in a clump!
Parsley freezes well, as Blissful said. I always plant more parsley than we could possibly use, and we run out shortly after Christmas.
Parsley is a cool season herb. We get a spring/early summer batch, and then it dies out. We replant about now, mid-September, and hope for a fall harvest.
Don't give up on parsley, and plant the large leaf Italian parsley. More taste even though it isn't as "cute" as the curly parsley.
Yes they were difficult. And they dried out on me in the soak. Maybe I ruined them?
Yes I only use flat leaf. Never curly.
Since parsley takes sooooo long to germinate, I sprout them, before planting. Sounds crazy, I know, but it really is a pain to keep it moist for 3 weeks, and they start sprouting in just 8 days - even less when soaked in GA-3. I don't use a lot of parsley, and it's not one of those herbs I dry or freeze - in the winter, I grow it in the hydroponics.

I just soak them overnight, then put them in a petri dish, with a layer of damp paper towels, 6-8 thick. Then I watch for the sprouts, and transfer them to a pot, with a pair of tweezers.

I knew I'd find a photo of those of I looked! Not sprouted yet, however.
More seeds going into the IP experiment - parsley, zaatar, cutting celery, and hoja santa. by pepperhead212, on Flickr
Now this I know how to do. I have started plants this way for years. Thanks.
I have no idea why this showed up under "new posts", since the most recent post was in 2018. I have grown parsley. I bought it already growing. It spread, a lot. I harvested what I needed and left the plants in the ground, because I'm lazy. It's a biennial plant. The next year it came back, but it's different in its second year. I could still use the leaves, but there were fewer of them. It made flowers and the flower dropped seeds. The next year, I got a lot more parsley. The third year I had both 1st year and 2nd year parsley. It kept coming back for quite a few years, with next to no input from me. Eventually it quit coming back. That may have been because other plants moved in and I didn't do anything about it.
My fault Taxlady. I was browsing new posts and saw the title. But your right and I'm not going back to look as to why it was in new posts.
Unless someone else posted before me.
 

msmofet

Chef Extraordinaire
Joined
Apr 5, 2009
Messages
13,057
I have no idea why this showed up under "new posts", since the most recent post was in 2018. I have grown parsley. I bought it already growing. It spread, a lot. I harvested what I needed and left the plants in the ground, because I'm lazy. It's a biennial plant. The next year it came back, but it's different in its second year. I could still use the leaves, but there were fewer of them. It made flowers and the flower dropped seeds. The next year, I got a lot more parsley. The third year I had both 1st year and 2nd year parsley. It kept coming back for quite a few years, with next to no input from me. Eventually it quit coming back. That may have been because other plants moved in and I didn't do anything about it.
I think all the posts are “new” since we switched to the new software. Till someone posts in the threads, they will be new. JMHO
 

blissful

Executive Chef
Joined
Mar 25, 2008
Messages
4,908
The confusion with dates of posts.....is where you are looking--you are looking at when the person JOINED, not the day they posted. Come on--people, you can figure this out.
I posted a new thread the other day, that is this thread. It's a new thread.
 

taxlady

Chef Extraordinaire
Moderator Emeritus
Joined
Sep 13, 2010
Messages
28,785
Location
near Montreal, Quebec
The confusion with dates of posts.....is where you are looking--you are looking at when the person JOINED, not the day they posted. Come on--people, you can figure this out.
I posted a new thread the other day, that is this thread. It's a new thread.
Yeah, it does look like I was looking at a join date. These things happen.
 

taxlady

Chef Extraordinaire
Moderator Emeritus
Joined
Sep 13, 2010
Messages
28,785
Location
near Montreal, Quebec
I think all the posts are “new” since we switched to the new software. Till someone posts in the threads, they will be new. JMHO
Yeah, I imagine that's why it was listed as a new post. I had clicked "New Posts" in the "What's new" pull down menu.
 

Roll_Bones

Master Chef
Joined
Oct 19, 2013
Messages
5,540
Location
Southeast US
The confusion with dates of posts.....is where you are looking--you are looking at when the person JOINED, not the day they posted. Come on--people, you can figure this out.
I posted a new thread the other day, that is this thread. It's a new thread.

Yeah, I imagine that's why it was listed as a new post. I had clicked "New Posts" in the "What's new" pull down menu.
This thread was started last Friday. It is brand new.
 
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