Boiling sausages

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sausagefans.com

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Jun 30, 2004
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Norfolk, UK
Does anyone here have any experience of boiling sausages? Its something I'm yet to try and I'm not sure what the results would be like...

Thanks

Stephen
 

purrfectlydevine

Sous Chef
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Sep 1, 2004
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PA
I simmer large rope sausage all the time. I cut it into serving size pieces (to make it easier to handle) and prick them a few times with a fork. I put them in a pan with enough water to come up a little more than halfway up the sausage. Simmer gently for about 10 minutes. Turn the pieces over and simmer about 10 minutes more or until no longer pink or you can use a meat thermometer.
 

auntdot

Head Chef
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Aug 25, 2004
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Totally agree with Purrfectlydevine's post, but would like to emphasize 'simmer gently'.

With many sausages you can get away with the heat a bit hotter, but for some you wind up with a lot of broken ones if one actually reaches the boil.

Always safe with a gentle simmer.

Used to make boudin and those require a very gentle simmer (when the links broke, the sausage was still OK to eat. It just was not eyeball friendly).

After boiling, can brown off the sausages if you like.

Now that I mentioned it, I gotta make me a mess of boudin soon (we can't get the stuff from the market here).:)
 

Lugaru

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Body: Boston Heart: Mexico
I grew up with sausages being fried instead of boiled so I'll usually at least give them a sear in the pan or 2 to 5 minutes worth of frying with very little oil. After that I add the liquid and simer on low for about 10 to 20. If you heat 'em up too much they will likely burst and you will end up losing a LOT of liquid which gives them their flavor.
 

Lugaru

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By natural casing do you mean intestine? It should be fine. It has a tendency to contract a little, to get a little tougher and sometimes burst the sausage but the last part rarely happens unless you use too much heat. In the end all it really does is give it a REALLY satisfying crunch or pop when you bite into it or try to cut it.
 

Raine

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We kinda boil them in a frying pan. Serve them with spaghetti and sauce.
 

lutzzz

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Oct 23, 2004
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Seattle/Edmonds
Another thought?

Guess I'm losing my mind :) ... didn't I reply to this in some other thread?

Anyway... from a "BBQ" perspective (not to mean the low/slow smoke cooking)... most folks I know have come to cooking their bratwurst by either:

1. Soak the brats in beer (I use Guinness Stout.. but that's kinda my thing and I'm not sure it makes that much difference.. and is more expensive).. some puncture the brats with a fork to let more flavor in... soak for an hour or two before you grill them... Most add some onion, perhaps a bay leaf, and some whole black peppercorns.

2. Then grill, charcoal preferred but I guess gas would work.. (I don't know 'cause I don't have gas unless I eat baked beans with onions)... to get the grill marks, brown, and crispy skin.

3. Then return to the pot of beer, onions, et. al. (I also add a lot of garlic but that's just me 'cause we have a terrible vampire problem here.. and I love garlic anyway.) and simmer for 15 or more minutes to finish cooking.

As an alternative (what I do)...

1. First simmer in beer with some onion, bay leaf, peppercorns (and I add garlic but that's up to you).. for about 20-30 minutes. Do NOT boil them.. simmer! This cooks them and takes all the pressure off.

2. Then brown on the grill to get the marks & crisp. If you don't want to watch and move them continually.. and don't want any charred parts, and don't want to cause them to split from excessive heat.. use indirect heat (move the coals to one side and/or turn off one burner and cook them on the other side).

3. Once they are browned and crisp, you can add them back into the lightly simmering beer to hold until you serve.

Everyone's mileage varies on cooking these things.. you might give this a try as an alternative to some of the above recommendations if so motivated.
 

norgeskog

Washing Up
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Aug 28, 2004
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Eugene, Oregon
sausagefans.com said:
Thanks guys, but if you use a banger with natural casings surely they are a bit chewy after a boil?

S

I love bangers but cannot find them in Eugene, Oregon. But I always fry to brown sausages otherwise they are unappetizing in appearance, look anemic.
 

lutzzz

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Seattle/Edmonds
norgeskog...

I don't recall any "bangers" when I lived in Eugene (and graduated from the U of O) either :) ... but there were places that sold various sausages...

I'm not sure I could afford them back in those days anyway
 

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Ishbel

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I cannot imagine boiling a British 'banger'... I think they would look really anaemic, a bit like a frankfurter? :mrgreen:
 

lutzzz

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Seattle/Edmonds
A Frankfurter?

Ishbel said:
I cannot imagine boiling a British 'banger'... I think they would look really anaemic, a bit like a frankfurter? :mrgreen:

Yeah.. terrible looking anaemic things... they look kinda like this. Difficult to image anyone would eat one of those things :)
 

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Ishbel

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Most of the frankfurters sold this side of the pond are boil in the tin type of things. I've never been brave enough to try them.

Give me the traditional British banger, whether Cumberland or Lincolnshire or good pork ones, made by my local butcher... I don't mind French style ones - not so keen on Spanish ones like chorizo.
 

norgeskog

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lutzzz said:
I don't recall any "bangers" when I lived in Eugene (and graduated from the U of O) either :) ... but there were places that sold various sausages...

I'm not sure I could afford them back in those days anyway

Glad to find a fellow DUCK here. They just started spring training, am looking forward to a good year. Yes I find a grand variety of sausages especially at Market of Choice and Trader Joe's. BTW both Wild Oats stores closed last year. Bummer, really miss them. My daughter attends UofO and also works in the Academic Advisor's office and the Starbucks on campus. Do you miss Eugene?
 

Rob Babcock

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Dec 23, 2004
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Big Sky Country
I really prefer to simmer many types of sausage in liquid composed of 2 parts water to 1 part beer. It doesn't matter much what kind of beer- the beer needn't be great, but really why buy crappy beer just to use a couple to cook brats?
 
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